Interview with Joseph Rauh
QUESTION 20
INTERVIEWER:

THAT MOMENT IN 1964, WHAT IF THE C—WHAT IF THE DELEGATION HAD BEEN SEATED? WHAT IF IN FACT THE COMPROMISE HADN'T BEEN FORGED?

Joseph Rauh:

And we had all been seated? Uh, if they… If the Convention had accepted what was really my basic proposal, seat ‘em both, which meant that they would have only seated us, so it would would just be us, so it was total victory. If that had happened it would have had very little greater effect than what did happen. What really happened was the promiseof, against discrimination, was the Civil Rights Committee set up for that very purpose, and then what happened was it, it opened the party. The party, now, the minorities have more than normal strength. And that started the day that that compromise was made. I don't think it would have made a dime's worth of difference whether we had won more. I wanted to win more. I tried to win more. I voted no, but it, historically we won when the Mississippi delegation, blacks half, whites half, walked on the floor as the delegation in 1964.