Interview with Rev. Frederick Reese
QUESTION 18
INTERVIEWER:

REVEREND REESE, WHEN YOU TOLD ME THAT STORY ON THE PHONE, ABOUT THOSE PEOPLE COMING IN, YOU TOLD ME SPECIFICALLY WHAT THEY SAID WHEN THEY CAME IN THE CHURCH AND WHAT YOU ALL SAID BACK. AND I WANT YOU TO JUST REAL BRIEFLY WHAT THEY SAID WHEN THEY CAME IN THE CHURCH AND GIVE ME MORE SENSE OF THE SPIRIT OF RECEIVING THEM FROM THE PEOPLE.

Rev. Frederick Reese:

Yeah, if you could imagine a congregation being somewhat subdued and the spirit flow. And all these question marks whether or not we wished to continue in this same vein or not. Then you hear the door of the church opening and here are a group of people, black and white coming to the church walking down the aisle to the front and saying to us, We are here to share with the people of Selma in this struggle for the right to vote. We have seen on the television screen the violence that took place today and we're here to share it with you.** And there was a round of applause in the church and you could feel a change in the atmosphere, a spirit of inspiration, uh, motivation and seemingly hope coming back uh into the eyes and into the minds of these people. And then renewed commitment to the non-violent, uh, method.** And from that point on it was just uh, a matter of uh, uh executing whatever commitment had been made on the part of the leaders uh, you know, of the movement.