Interview with Amelia Boynton Robinson
QUESTION 1
INTERVIEWER:

OK, MRS. ROBINSON, YOU TOLD ME THAT BACK IN THE EARLY 1960S SELMA WAS A RURAL TOWN, LOT OF FARMING, THAT'S WHAT BLACKS WERE INVOLVED IN. COULD YOU DESCRIBE A LITTLE BIT—GIVE ME A WORD PICTURE OF WHAT IT WAS LIKE FOR BLACKS AT THAT TIME IN SELMA—WHAT THEY WERE DOING?

Amelia Boynton Robinson:

When I came here in 1930, I was surprised to know that Selma was the type of place where people came from throughout the entire county with their goods to sell, because this is a rural section. And this is the only place that they had that they could sell their goods. It also served as a shopping center for the counties that surrounded it. Consequently, there were more rural people and more people of Dallas County who would come to the city and would improve the, the income of the city than any other place. However, the city officials and the whites were somehow encouraged to take their monies, but they were not treated in any way, in many cases, as human beings.