Interview with Sonia Sanchez
QUESTION 2
INTERVIEWER:

Tell me about your first impression of Malcolm.

SONIA SANCHEZ:

See what's interesting about, talking about Malcolm is that quite often people always want to make you believe that he was some terrible, terrible man who never smiled and who was always scowling. And, and demanding something that was obscene almost. When I first saw Malcolm on the television, he scared me also. Immediately the family said, "Turn off that television. That man is saying stuff you ain't supposed to hear." And so of course we did. But always, you know when the sun comes in the window and you kind of jump up to get it, to close the blinds or pull down the shade, but before you do that, the sun comes in? Well before, each time we turned the television off a little sun came in. And you'd be walking someplace and it would resonate in the ear what he said. And you would say, "No, I can't listen to that because I'm in New York Core." You know, "I can't listen to that because they say he's a racist. And he must be a racist if they say he's a racist." So don't listen. Well one day we, we were doing a huge demonstration in Harlem. Right in front of the old Hotel Theresa, which doesn't exist anymore in Harlem. Right diagonally across from Mr. Mashow's[SIC] bookstore, there on 7th Avenue before he had to move to Lennox because of that building, the state building that was going to be built there.

INTERVIEWER:

Do that again without, um,--

SONIA SANCHEZ:

My fingers?

INTERVIEWER:

No, your fingers are fine. Without talking about Mashow's[SIC] moving.