Interview with Bernie Schweid
QUESTION 10
INTERVIEWER:

UM, WAS IT WHEN THE VIOLENCE CONTINUED, WAS THERE, WAS THERE CONCERN THAT IT WASN'T GOING TO GO AWAY, OR WAS THERE A CONCERN FOR YOUR COMMUNITY, WAS, DID IT BECOME A COMMUNITY-TYPE THING, CONCERN?

Bernie Schweid:

I don't recall any -uh- cohesive -uh- community concern about the -uh- sit-ins. There w-, there was o'course, there were certain, you know, small group of liberals that you always find who would -uh- make resolutions -uh- for integration and against the violence and things like this. But any widespread -uh- community concern, I don't think it really came up until folks -uh- a lot of people find their pocketbooks were hit, and the economic thing I believe was stronger than the fact that maybe some people quietly thought, you know, this is against their religious beliefs, or it was immoral, or something along that line. People, -uh- it seems like people don't give up stuff until they almost have to, till some supreme violence or an economic -uh- hardship forces them to do it.