Interview with Bernie Schweid
QUESTION 2
INTERVIEWER:

LET ME TALK TO YOU ABOUT THE PEOPLE OF NASHVILLE AND THE IDEA THAT IN THAT, THAT TRADITIONAL, SMALL TOWN THEY CARED MORE ABOUT EACH OTHER AND THINGS OF PERSONAL RELATIONSHIP KIND OF.

Bernie Schweid:

I think that was the main thing in your relations with people, is that -uh- if they liked you, they would be willing to overlook some eccentricities and there were some eccentric – and always had been some - real eccentric, people here. Sort of like you find maybe in England, and -uh- I'm not - you could have certain views that didn't agree with - whether it was on race or politics or whatever, and you could discuss it without getting in any great personal dislike or threats or things like that. There were some people who were really extreme and they might, -uh- you know, not say I'll never do business with you anymore or something like that. But I think that wasn't as widespread as a lot of business people seem to fear. I don't think people take that all into so much account – least down here, and if they liked you as a person, I think that was the main thing. You could talk about things and -uh- the personal relationship was the main business. I think -uh- the -uh- a lot of –uh- black people were -uh - were — you had dealings with them all the time. It wasn't like up north where -uh- you were so - that separated – you were constantly in contact with each other. And it was sort of a paternalistic feeling. But there was this sort of strange kind of -uh - love that existed between, in many cases, between the races.