Interview with Bernie Schweid
QUESTION 3
INTERVIEWER:

NOW, IN 1960 THE SIT-INS STARTED, THE PROTESTS STARTED. -UH- WERE THEY TAKEN SERIOUSLY IMMEDIATELY OR…

Bernie Schweid:

Well, -uh- probably not -uh- by most people. Most people did not take the sit-ins too seriously at the beginning because they felt, well you know, these are not- these are the outside… these are agitators, these are students, they've come from New York, and -uh- other places, and -uh- they're not the one… they're not our -uh- negroes. Uh, our negroes are happy, they're well off, and we know them, and -uh- we'd even -uh- sometimes -uh- ask, you know, some of these people would ask their maid or something I mean, "This is a joke?" you know. And the maid would say, "Oh, I don't pay no attention to them. No good trash." And then she'd leave and she'd go off to the NAACP meeting.** I mean this was Harry Golden's story. But, -uh- I don't think there was a great understanding of the seriousness of what was going on by most of the white people in - in Nashville when its - when all this began. It took a while for it really sink in.