Interview with Bernie Schweid
QUESTION 5
INTERVIEWER:

NOW. LOBE'S HOUSE …LOBE'S HOUSE IS BOMBED. WHAT DOES THAT, WHAT DOES THAT DO TO YOU?

Bernie Schweid:

Well, when that… there's always seems like there's always an event like that that sets things into motion. You know, when Lobe's house was bombed, -uh- it just seemed to be like one of those milestones, one of those events and -uh- when those things happen, it seems terrible at the time… and it is terrible but sometimes it creates -uh- a new situation where something else has to move in to take its place, and this was, I guess, one of those occasions. Alexander Lobe, he was the man who was the leader who – of the blacks - he was defending the kids and he was a symbol. And when this happened - the so-called respectful whites, they couldn't say "Hey, he you know, he deserved this for it." 'Cause he was not –uh- he was an older man, and -uh- I think it didn't make every… all the White people say we gotta, "Hey, we gotta do something about this. We gotta integrate the lunch rooms and let 'em in the movies", and this kind of thing. It didn't do that but it did… it couldn't come out and say "Well, I sympathize with the bombing like that." There was -uh- something… I had a black friend I called the next day and he said, "You wait. Something good'll come out of this. This is terrible, but this is gonna be the beginning of something…" I think that bombing was.