Interview with Ronald Scott
QUESTION 19
INTERVIEWER:

What changed on that relationship?

RON SCOTT:

The thing that changed is that Black people--

INTERVIEWER:

I'm sorry, because I didn't give you, the relationship between Black and White.

RON SCOTT:

In 1967 or around that time the relationship between Black people and the rest of America changed. And that is Black people were not willing to accept being less than a real human being and accept less than everybody else was getting. That's why people stole a color television set, they wanted the same thing everybody else had. And in 1967 for us, for we as young people, we decided that we would rather die than ever live in a situation where we couldn't have, uh, the same things that everybody else had, and the rights and the opportunities and everything else. And I didn't come to that conclusion until maybe a year or two later, but that's ultimately what we felt, and that we could change the world, and that we could change our relationships. That we could stand up with anybody else in society and that we didn't have to hate ourselves and we didn't have to feel like we were less. That changed. I saw it change within a period in m--the lives of my friends and me within a period in this town of less than 12 months in some cases. Whether it lasted is another thing, but I saw it happen.

INTERVIEWER:

Cut. Okay.