Interview with Ronald Scott
QUESTION 20
INTERVIEWER:

...comes to the door and talk about what they did but understand folks are saying, "Hey it's a riot, what are they expecting?"

RON SCOTT:

You know when these guys came to my door is that most people can't understand, or most people who are going to watch this--

INTERVIEWER:

Start again.

RON SCOTT:

Wh--what a lot of people really don't understand is that as I was standing there, I'm standing on the opposite side of the door and these guys are banging my door like they going to knock it in. I had a choice. I mean I could go and open the door or I could stand there and let them kick it down, because in terms of what we had read and what we had seen at that time we knew that if they got past that door that our lives might be in danger, and that they didn't have any reason to come into our house, they didn't have any right to come in there, but that they were going to do, by this time people had been killed just for opening their doors. I went and I opened the door and here are these guys, all these guys were my age, young White guys in my home with my sister who was five, my brother who was three, and my mother there. And I was the only person between them and the rest of my family. And I felt violated, I felt like in any minute that these guys, who had no respect, when they walked in they said, "We heard some shooting here." They didn't walk up and they didn't say, "Look Mr. Scott or, we heard something, could you help us?" They walked in and say, "We heard some shooting here." I mean they took control of our house and in terms of trying to take control of our house, well they were there, they were in the apartment. The only thing that we could do was stand there and take it because there was nowhere to go. And I don't know if anybody else in that situation would have, I don't know what they would have done. Because i--I felt at that particular moment that since it was a situation of life and death, this guy looked at me and he looked as if he wanted to kill me at that moment because I would dare to stand in my house to protect my house against somebody who was coming in. Whatever he felt, whether he felt it was a sniper there or not, I had the right in my house to stay there and to live there and not be worried about whether somebody was going to possibly kill me. And that's what I was worried about. And I was angry and I was frightened, and I felt angry enough so that if I could have gotten my hands on the gun he had, that it might have been the other way around.

INTERVIEWER:

Cut.