Interview with Ronald Scott
QUESTION 5
INTERVIEWER:

Talk a little bit about what it was like being in a home, and your father coming back from the factory tired, frustrated and it not being like "Ozzie and Harriet"?

RON SCOTT:

Well um, my mother remarried and so my stepfather, uh, uh--

INTERVIEWER:

Just say, "My step father..."

RON SCOTT:

Okay, my stepfather uh, worked in the foundry, worked at Ford Rouge Foundry. Ford Rouge is the largest industrial complex in, in America, or was at that time. Ah, Henry Ford, uh, built a complex whereby you could build a car from start to finish, raw materials, had a glass plant...

INTERVIEWER:

If you could just not worry about that--

RON SCOTT:

Okay.

INTERVIEWER:

...and just start...

RON SCOTT:

Okay, fine. Okay.

INTERVIEWER:

Ok, keep going.

RON SCOTT:

So my father worked in the foundry where most Blacks worked and uh, because they weren't allowed to work in the, you know, the upper echelon jobs, upper echelon in, in terms of the industrial world being the glass plant, the frame plant, or shall I say the easier jobs. The foundry was like the coal mine, the foundry is where you turn the, uh, the coke that was used ultimately to build, to make the steel, that was where you shoveled it or did whatever was necessary. Ah, my stepfather was a dark, uh, brown-skinned man, when he came home he would come home looking Black from the, from the coke ovens. Um, and uh, he and his friends I remember used to sit out in their car for hours, um, drinking and, uh, all the guys worked in a factory generally worked in the same place. And, uh, sometimes, uh, when he'd come in he would get, uh, hostile, angry, even violent. And, uh, at the time I was you know, really kind of upset and frightened and so forth by it. And he was generally a pretty good guy, I mean, uh, but at the times when he would drink, uh, after, usually after coming home from the factory, which would be 2, 3 in the afternoon, about the time I'd be getting out of school.

INTERVIEWER:

Cut.

RON SCOTT:

Yea.

INTERVIEWER:

That's a touching story.