Interview with Bobby Seale
QUESTION 9
INTERVIEWER:

Were, were Black folks in the, in the community able to understand your Marxist perspective, the Maoist perspective that came into the party?

BOBBY SEALE:

Yeah, but you see, what we did is we inculcated it in a way that we were saying it from the Black Panther Party point of view in analysis--

INTERVIEWER:

Could you say that again and say the Maoist perspective or whatever?

BOBBY SEALE:

The, it wasn't a Maoist perspective that we had so much. We knew some of the principles that were applicable to our situation in the USA in terms of the organizing principles, what have you. Ah, we were more or less, uh, we believed in a sort of a coop--cooperative socialism and we didn't accept, per se, a sort of a state control command economy type concept. So the way we did it, we pulled from what we thought was valuable to us. And, yes, brothers and sisters began to accept that. I mean, you'd have to imagine a brother who has been taught how to read in the Black Panther party standing up and telling another brother on dope, "Brother, you're acting in an unprincipled manner." You know what I mean. "That practice is the criterion of the truth," and things like this here. So this is one of the things, to have grassroots brothers and sisters citing principle posture, taking a principle posture and trying to educate the community and kind of, in, in the attempt to help raise the conscience of the Black community.