Interview with Cleveland Sellers
QUESTION 24
INTERVIEWER:

You are now in Jackson and at the end of the march what were your feelings about the future of the Civil Rights Movement based on what you had seen happening with the splits that were occurring...?

CLEVELAND SELLERS:

We were, we were, ah--

INTERVIEWER:

You were in Jackson, Mississippi.

CLEVELAND SELLERS:

In, in, in Jackson, when we get to Jackson, and this is the culmination, ah, of the march. We are all, ah, in, living in the Tugaloo area, camping out in the Tugaloo area and we're setting up for the, for the, ah, finale. This is the big rally and speech and all that kind of stuff. There was a certain amount of, of excitement and there was a, an energizing, ah, feeling that was among many of the SNCC people because we felt like we had been successful in pushing back some of the, ah, persons who were giving definition to the, to the movement and, and allowing people to have an opportunity to speak. If Black people wanted to secure empowerment through an effort called Black Power then they should have that opportunity. And people should not be frightened away because they lose resources or because they no longer were considered popular or they no longer had control of their, ah, flock. We didn't, we didn't feel that same way. The efforts here was to push the, the community as far as we could to try to educate it, try to, try to develop models by which it could further organize itself. And, and to be real and honest, most of the work that was done by SNCC was done in Black communities and that's the reality. Ah, SNCC as an organization, had always been, ah, run and, and led primarily by, ah, predominantly Black, ah, staff and, and operation. So it's, it wasn't anything new, it's just a perception.