Interview with Betty Shabazz
QUESTION 1
CARROLL BLUE:

Dr. Shabazz what should young Black people know about Malcolm that we don't already know? What is his legacy?

BETTY SHABAZZ:

What should young people know about Malcolm. I, I think, ah, one of the most important things in the view of contemporary society, they should ah, know about his internal strength and discipline. And, ah, understand that, ah, that a lot of people can climb the mountains and deal with people on a very affluent level, but don't understand what is happening in the valleys. And that if they are going to be future leaders, that people are going to have to understand the diversity, ah, of people, ah, ethnicity, political, religious, you know. And, ah, if you really look at our society today, you find the Baptists preaching to the Baptists, and the Methodists preaching to the Methodists, and the Buddhists to the Buddhists, and the Muslims to the Muslims. I think religion will have to cross those various lines, and deal with people on an ecumenical basis or level, and I think that people will have to, ah, put humanity above the power of politics. Ah, we need to understand the struggles, the, the whole situation of, of, of, ah, of struggle, as I've said before, the challenges and the resources, that face people not just in America, not just next door, but all over the world. Have people in such conflict, ah, for power that they will level a country, ah, neighborhoods, ah, civilians, regardless, women and children, and old men and old women. For that power that we are going to have to come together as people and understand, ah, that whole humanitarian dilemma. And, and understand where, and the importance of power. So that I think Malcolm had conquered all of that, and was moving towards those extreme ends that have our country and the world, as a matter of fact, so divided today. That, ah, I think it would be important for young people to understand all of that, and know that the answers are here on Earth. The answers are within our grips, but if we don't have the internal fortitude, or internal strength or integrity. A loyalty to ourselves and other human beings that we might go to sleep and not wake up as a world people. And, ah, I think if, if young people understood that, and the fact that they have a responsibility to deal with themselves, and find answers to those challenges that confront us all. And, and I might say getting worse.

CARROLL BLUE:

Stop right there.