Interview with Arthur Shores
QUESTION 18
INTERVIEWER:

OK, I'M TRYING TO GET RIGHT BACK INTO BIRMINGHAM, THOUGH. BECAUSE YOU'RE LOOKING AT THINGS FROM WHAT — HOW THEY TURNED OUT, AND I'M JUST KIND OF WONDERING WHAT THE FEELINGS WERE DURING UH THOSE DAYS IN BIRMINGHAM. UM, BURKE MARSHALL FINALLY HAD TO COME IN, THINGS GOT SO OUTRAGEOUS THAT BURKE MARSHALL CAME IN FROM THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENT TO NEGOTIATE A SETTLEMENT WITH THE CITY. UH WHAT DO YOU RECALL ABOUT THOSE UH, NEGOTIATIONS?

Arthur Shores:

Well, of course, such a radical change to a city that had been uh, in the situation it was, the separation of the races, by law, uh, naturally, it was a traumatic experience for those who didn't appreciate that, and they still uh, were reluctant to give in to give in to it until, you say, Burke Marshall came in, and I forget what other government officials came in to see if we couldn't get together on some basis. And as a result of that, the power structure of this city, saw the need of uh, change. And as I probably mentioned to you on the telephone, as a result of this Operation New Birmingham grew out of that.