Interview with Arthur Shores
QUESTION 19
INTERVIEWER:

OK UM LET'S JUST KIND OF GO ON A LITTLE BIT TO UH, BEYOND THE UM, DEMONSTRATIONS AT THAT TIME. IN JUNE OF '63, OF COURSE, THAT WAS WHEN GEORGE WALLACE MADE GOOD ON HIS CAMPAIGN PROMISE TO STAND IN THE SCHOOLHOUSE DOOR. YOU WERE THERE WITH VIVIAN J. MALONE, I BELIEVE. TELL ME ABOUT THE DAY YOU ACCOMPANIED HER INTO SCHOOL.

Arthur Shores:

Well, if I might go back a little. We had been notified to come to Washington, uh, me along with one or two other of my associates, and the Attorney General notified us that the Governor was going to carry out his campaign promise to stand in the schoolhouse door, but when he is uh, requested to step aside, that he would step aside. And then of course uh, we did accompany her, with uh Katzenbach, who was uh, Assistant U.S. Attorney, and the — the state militia had been federalized, so they accompanied us to uh Montgomery, to see – I mean, to Tuscaloosa, to see that she was admitted, and General Graham, who was – who was the leader of the uh, militia, when we approached the Governor, I mean uh, he was there in the door. And uh General Graham instructed that Governor, it's my unpleasant to tell you to step aside. And the Governor made a little speech, and immediately stepped aside, so there was nothing else about it. That's – It went on off smoothly. She remained there, she graduated, and subsequent to that, many blacks have graduated. I have even received an honorary doctorate degree, as the first black from the University of Alabama. And I say, it's ironic, when I carried the first black there, they had to close the school for three days, as a result of riots, and in 1976, '76, they awarded me this honorary doctorate degree.