Interview with Arthur Shores
QUESTION 2
INTERVIEWER:

NOW, SOMEWHERE EARLY IN YOUR CAREER, YOU MUST HAVE BEEN INVOLVED WITH THE AUTHERINE LUCY CASE. I WONDER IF YOU COULD COMMENT ON THAT, AND THE IMPORTANCE OF IT.

Arthur Shores:

Well, the Autherine Lucy case was, an application was made, in about 1952, they refused to admit her, so, we filed an action in the federal court, and the federal court author — authorized them to admit her. The University appealed the case. The case went to the United States Supreme Court, and the Court of the United States Supreme Court directed that she be admitted, and this was 1954, before the case had closed, and she was — they were directed to admit her at the University of Alabama. And on taking her down to the University, she was admitted, but for three days there were riots on the campus. They had to close the school down for three days. And, finally, as a result of certain statements, uh she was suspended or expelled. And that was the end of uh, that particular attention of the record of blacks to the University of Alabama.