Interview with Arthur Shores
QUESTION 31
INTERVIEWER:

O.K., YOU'VE HAD A NUMBER OF OUTSTANDING EXPERIENCES IN THE HISTORY OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT YOURSELF, DR. SHORES. AUTHERINE LUCY UM, THE SCHOOLHOUSE DOOR WITH VIVIAN MALONE, AND THE LIST JUST GOES ON. WHAT IS YOUR OUTSTANDING MEMORY? WHAT DO YOU THINK IS YOUR FINEST HOUR, YOUR MAJOR CONTRIBUTION TO ALL THIS?

Arthur Shores:

Well, in several counties, even before the university case, Viv Malone and Autherine Lucy, but where blacks were denied the right to register, I have gone from the Tennessee line down to Mobile, in various counties, bringing lawsuits which required blacks to be registered to vote. And one of the outstanding cases here in this county, where six of us uh sought to become members of the state executive Democratic committee, and they refused to uh accept our fees, to be uh listed as candidates, and we went into federal court, and they were required to do so, and all six of us were elected, and I'm still a member of the uh state executive Democractic committee. And on three occasions, was an elected member to the state uh — for the national Democratic committee. And I think — I believe I was the first black who actually addressed the National Democratic committee. I was on the credentials committee from Birmingham, only two of us, a white woman, who was from Mobile, and myself. And uh, however, these two were more outstanding, the incident at the schoolhouse door, and that sort of thing, but there were many other cases that uh advanced the welfare of blacks, even before those cases. That zoning ordinance, you know.