Interview with Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth
QUESTION 6
INTERVIEWER:

I WANT YOU TO, YOU WERE, START AT IT, BUT I WANT YOU TO GIVE ME A LITTLE BIT MORE CONCISE, BRIEF WORD PICTURE, IF YOU MIGHT, ABOUT WHAT LIFE WAS LIKE IN THE 1950'S FOR BLACK FOLKS PARTICULARLY. AND IF THERE'S SOME ANECDOTE THAT COMES TO MIND THAT MAY PARTICULARLY ILLUSTRATE THAT, THIS IS THE TIME.

Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth:

Well, you must remember that we were two societies. Blacks and whites couldn't play together, couldn't sit together, couldn't go down the street together. In 1948, in Birmingham, Alabama, United States Senator Glenn Taylor was arrested for sitting in a church, same church with the black children were killed in '63, with Negroes. Bull Connor was the epitome of segregation and Bull Connor had a saying, "Blacks and whites are not going to segregate together." A misnomer, but he said it. And even in mass demonstrations he said, "Birmingham may become a dead city, it will never become an integrated city." And when the massive struggle began and somebody went to him and said, "Now, Mr. Connor, this is a law-abiding country…

FILM PRODUCTION TEAM:

OK, that was a Camera Roll out on 538, we're going to 539, and I'm going to a 415 Mini-Shotgun. This is Camera Roll 539. I have flags.