Interview with Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth
QUESTION 8
INTERVIEWER:

WHAT DID YOU THINK OF THE IMPACT OF THE MONTGOMERY BUS BOYCOTT?

Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth:

It was the first actual massive uprising. You must remember that there had been boycotts in, I believe in Tallahassee, Florida, and Baton Rouge, Louisiana before Montgomery. But here in Montgomery, I say all the elements came together. There was the idea, there was a man, then there was God's power and all these come together. And, then it's time for a movement. There was Martin Luther King, a new young, a new man out of Boston University had come to pastor Dexter Avenue Church, there was a need, there was—from '54 up to now the moving and musings in people's hearts and so Montgomery protest sparked the opportunity for a movement wherein Negroes could rise up actively and challenge the system without violence. And I think one of the very important things that must be said is, that Dr. King spoke with a new voice. Not only was it a new movement, but it was a new voice that you must love, you must not hate the people who hate, or who act like they hate you, you must—and the best thing to make out of your enemy is a friend. So, this was a—had a very profound effect upon not only blacks, but whites at this time.**