Interview with Frank Smith (Big Black)
QUESTION 9
SAM POLLARD:

Tell me what it was like, those first moments ? What was it like in that yard when you first ?

FRANK "BIG BLACK" SMITH:

To be in that yard and my feelings after I entered the yard was out, it would, it would take a lifetime, really for me to explain it to you, a feeling of and, and, and a view of unity and, and seeing everybody regardless to the color or hue, being under the same condition or the same situation, and everybody being out there together and, and, and the first time in seven years of seeing that many people being around each other and being in some form of unity and some form of collective ideas and, and, and projection I guess is what I would call it. The harmony that I seen and some kind of, the words, you know, is hard to describe and the feeling is hard to describe but it's a feeling of like being born again, where you didn't have to worry about who you were or what color you were or where you were at, you know, even being in prison, you know, I didn't feel it then. I didn't even feel like I was in Attica State Prison, just to view what was happening in that yard, you know, it's like freedom. And it was a form of freedom. You know, I didn't have, you know, that keeper up on top of me and, and, I felt like whatever I was feeling, whatever I was thinking was running together, my emotions was into my thoughts and my feelings, you know, and I had all of that together and I, and I used that emotion when I was in the yard to bring, to solidify my thoughts and my feelings and that I was thinking what I was feeling. And everybody else was in that kind of vehicle, the way I felt. I felt, I felt good, ya know. I felt relieved. I felt, I guess, liberated. You know. That I didn't have to worry about the bar in the front of me. Even though I knew that I was, I felt and knew that I was in prison, now that's the reality. But that visible thing wasn't there no more. You know the walls was there but that bar wasn't really in the front of me, that visible bar. It was more invisible then.**It was a good feeling, as especially after we started dealing and started organizing and started talking about the conditions and started talking about why were out there and started talking about the grievances and started talking about why we were rebelling and why rebelling was necessary, the feeling became more and more and more into me and I started feeling a part of it more** and it brought me more aware of really who I were, where I were, and what I had to deal with and what was being dealt with in a unified, collective fashion.

SAM POLLARD:

Great. That was great.