Interview with Frank Smith (Big Black)
QUESTION 5
SAM POLLARD:

We'll go on to the next question here: George Jackson had died. What happened the day of his death. Describe what happened that morning.

FRANK "BIG BLACK" SMITH:

That was one of the most--

SAM POLLARD:

Include the day--

FRANK "BIG BLACK" SMITH:

Yeah, the George Jackson death.

SAM POLLARD:

Why don't you just pick it up again.

FRANK "BIG BLACK" SMITH:

OK, the George Jackson's death, you know, the day of his death, ah, the day afterwards, you know, really, was one of the most, I guess it was gloomy just like the 13th, you know, you could see death, you could feel it, you know, everybody was in a very, very down syndrome, you know, and that self-esteem was very low. You know and it was a broad thing to see you know. And really when it, when it really hit me is going to breakfast that When it really hit me was going to breakfast that morning and everybody was quiet, nobody wasn't picking up no silverware, you know when you go in the dining room, in the mess hall, you had to pick up a knife, spoon and fork and when you come out you had to have that. nobody was picking it up, nobody was talking.** And I was trying to figure out, you know, what was happening. You know what I mean, I kept asking some of the fellows, you know, that I was hanging out with, you know, what was going on, and, and they started explaining to me, you know, Brother George, you know, Soledad Brother, and duh duh dah, this happened in California but it was a, it was a thing to see, you know. And it remind me, and I seen it again, you know, in the yard, you know, in Attica how unity and, and how people could really come together around the same common goals, you know, and it, it was a very, very a broad thing to see and a good feeling to have, you know, around George Jackson's death. It's bad, you know that it had to be behind his death, you know, but it brought some form of unity all the way to New York State. We felt it.

SAM POLLARD:

Cut.OK, stop down.