Interview with Kathy Stapleton
QUESTION 6
PAUL STECKLER:

Now, tell me, describe to me interactions were like--what were relations like between Black kids and White kids? I remember you said stuff about taunts from the bus, and describing what the inside of the school was like.

KATHY STAPLETON:

Well, regarding taunts from the bus, I feel that, ah, I remember, um, buses pulling up and, and they would be, at the very beginning, especially, there would be crowds of, of parents and children outside and, and students coming in on the buses would say to us, I hear--you know, I would hear them say, "We have your school, how does it feel? It's our school now." You know, because these children were actually going in where we were on the outside at that point in time, at the beginning. And, inside the school, it was not, um, it was not very good. I think both the students that were bused in, and the students that were there, did not know how to react to each other. And, there was not much interaction, at all. It was still basically segregated. Um, for safety reasons, they felt that they had to keep the Black and the White students apart most of the time. Ah, they had separate doors going in. And, when the buses would be unloaded. And, if the buses would be unloading and you were coming into school, they would actually ask you to wait and let the bus--kids off the buses come in first. And, um, they had, uh, if there was an altercation, they had what they called a White holding room, and a Black holding room. And, we would be released from school at the end of the day, everybody would go to their homeroom and they would, uh, announce that the children being bused--which were the Black children--would have to leave first, and that the walkers--the Whites--would have to sit in class till school emptied out. So, it was not what it usually was, the bell rang and everybody filed out, it just didn't work that way. It was a lot of segregation within the school, which was really silly, because, or stupid, because, I mean what is the point? What is the whole point here? It was, it didn't make any sense at all.

PAUL STECKLER:

Okay, cut.