Interview with Marion Stamps
QUESTION 3
MADISON DAVIS LACY:

Um, you knew Fred obviously?

MARION STAMPS:

Oh, I loved Fred Hampton, I, I mean, I have, you know, there are very few Black men--

MADISON DAVIS LACY:

Okay, I love Fred Hampton.

MARION STAMPS:

I loved Fred Hampton. You know, there are about, there are about four Black men in my lifetime that I can say I truly loved. One of them was Professor Ed Marksman, Tranquility Philip[SIC], Fred Hampton, and my daddy, and in that order. You know, I, I, um, I think that Fred Hampton represent the epitome of Black manhood because first of all he had so much respect for Black women and Black children. I mean this was a brother that you, you, you just knew from being in the room with him that he loved Black babies, I mean, you know, uh, period. If Fred Hampton was living today, the problems we're having in the Black community, we would not have them. He would not tolerate it. He would not tolerate Black men selling drugs. Fred would not tolerate sisters standing on the corners selling their bodies for a toot, okay. We don't, and, and, and because he would not have tolerated that, then those of us who were in the Party would not tolerate it either, you know, so we lost, I mean, when they murdered Fred Hampton, we lost. And we got to, you know, and the one thing that we gotta do is that we gotta make sure that we tell the next generation the truth so that they can understand that all of these so-called role models they put in front of our faces, they, they are not the ones. It's alright to talk about Air Jordan, but running in the air ain't going to save us, okay. And even that thing, see, now, you know, it, White folks are so determined to destroy the next generation, they understand that for the most part they have already gotten us, okay. So, so they're working on the babies and it's always been that way, okay. So now they give us phoney heroes and phoney role models, you know. If a Fred Hampton would emerge right now, it would throw this country in total chaos. I mean you got to understand how frightened, J. Edgar Hoover, you know, the head of the CIA--how frightened he was of Fred. He himself said he was a Black messiah. So you know if they know, we know, okay? So, um, I just love Fred Hampton, I love Fred Hampton because of what he was, what he believed in, what he practiced, you know. You, you wouldn't, I have never seen Fred in contradiction of anything that he believed in. That's real important. I have never seen Fred move in an unprincipled manner, that's real important. I understood clearly Fred had a moral code of conduct by which he moved and operated out of. That is real important. So I feel blessed having been around and, and, and fortunate to have been in his presence and to have gained the information and the knowledge that I gained from him. I feel cheated that White folks murdered him, and I'm going, I'm not ever going to forget that and I'm not ever going to forgive that because the only thing, um, that Fred was about was power to the people. And, and, and we have a right to have that kind of power, you know, so. We struggled through it, you know, we'll survive it, but we can't never forget that, you know. And, and, and it's interesting that we fought to get Dr. King's birthday a holiday and, and we deserved that and Dr. King deserved that. But I think that as begin to write out own history and tell the whole story, then one of the things we have to tell our children, "It is your responsibility to understand who you are, where you came from, where you gotta go. And just don't accept Dr. King's birthday as being it." You know, "Find out what, who Malcolm was and what Malcolm was about, and what Malcolm contribution has been that has made it possible for you today to even be here. Know who Fred was," you know, "don't be afraid of it. Don't be afraid to learn what this brother was about." You know, "Because see, they will have wanted you to believe simply because he was a man. Then he was s--something to, to fear. But the only people that feared Fred were those who were untrue, those who were not ready, those who were, who were, perpetuating uh, uh, uh, uh, our enslavement, you know, those who knew Fred did not fear Fred, they loved him," you know, "and it wasn't a Jim Jones kind of love, okay." So, so our children got to know what this brother did and what his contribution was to our own movement and to our own liberation and, and our own existence as Black people. And, and if they just understand a little of that, if they understand just two or three points of the Ten Plat--plat--Ten Point Platform that governed the Black Panther Party, then they'll understand why they go into institutions of higher learning. We don't send you all there for you all to come out being a Xeroxed copy of the little White boy, the little White girl you sitting next to. We send you to those institution of higher learning to gain as much knowledge that you can get to come back into the Black community and move the Black community to the next phase of our liberation, because as long as we're Black people in America, we will always be slaves.

MADISON DAVIS LACY:

Stop down now.