Interview with Marion Stamps
QUESTION 4
MADISON DAVIS LACY:

How'd you feel when Fred was killed? What was it like going to his house?

MARION STAMPS:

I will never forget when Fred Hampton was murdered. One of the brothers called me and asked me had I heard. I said, "Heard what?" He said, uh, "They just murdered Fred." And, uh, you know, it was like somebody calling you telling you that somebody had just gunned down your mama in the streets, you know. So, um, I went next door and I got, uh, this sister to watch my children and I went to the hea--at first I went to the Black Panther Party headquarters 'cause that's where everybody was and we cried and, you know, went through everything, and cursed and jumped up and down, you know. I feel the same way now I felt then, I felt anger, I felt hurt, and I felt revenge, and that's the way I feel now. So, you know, we, we sort of like took turns in going over to, uh, the house where he was murdered at. And, and then you gotta, all this time, you know, all of these lies are coming from the media, you know. E--everywhere, you know, all over the headquarters, you know, you couldn't get rid of the reporters, the police, you know, the curiosity seekers, you know, I, you know, and, and the lies, the lies, you know. "They had guns." "They did this." "We didn't shoot." "Yes you did." "No we don't." You know, but then when you go to the house, right, and you look and you see. And you look at the bed, you know, and, and, and you see the blood, and, uh, and it's like, "Yeah well, you know, one thing them suckers understood is that they was coming at a king," you know. And they, they came at him like that, you know. They, they, they, I mean you could just, you know, when you look at the house with all the bullets and all the stuff that they had done to the house, i--it was like--

MARION STAMPS:

--an invasion.

MADISON DAVIS LACY:

We missed it, we got roll out, we're going to have to go back and get you to do that--





MADISON DAVIS LACY:

Tell me about going through the house again and this time try and keep your eyes focused on me.

MARION STAMPS:

Oh, okay.

MADISON DAVIS LACY:

It's okay that you weren't, but I understand. Go ahead.

MARION STAMPS:

Um, going in the house and looking at all, all the gunshots, the, the bullet holes, um, how they had tore the whole house up, everything, it was, it was, it was obvious it was an invasion. It was, it was as though the policemen had hyped themselves up for weeks in terms of how they going to kill this king. I mean to me it was, you know, the biblical, uh, story in terms of how they came at Moses, you know, and, I mean that's the way it, they inv--they invaded Fred and they, with the whole purpose of murdering him, assassinating him. And it was, it was like they were so frai--afraid of him that they knew that they had to come the way they came, you know, and they came very, very viciously, they came after him just like a thief in the night, and they snat--they just snatched Fred's life just like that, you know. And, and, and it's just like, "Why? Why? This brother may have nothing to none of you all. The only thing that this brother has done was to instill a sense of pride and dignity and self determination in his people."** You know, but we understood even better than Hoover did that he was, in fact, the one, okay. He was the one. And because we know he was the one, we know that there are some others, you know, and that's why it's real, real important that we have to protect our babies, the born and the unborn because we don't know which one of 'em is a Fred Hampton, a Malcolm X, a Dr. King, a Harriet Tubman, a Sojourner Truth, or a Marion Stamps, we don't know.

MADISON DAVIS LACY:

Okay, let's stop now. Good. Lets catch our breaths.