Interview with Marion Stamps
QUESTION 8
MADISON DAVIS LACY:

Okay, y'all get rid of him and now it comes to she, ah, she appoints this appoint this other cat.

MARION STAMPS:

Andrew Mooney, at $72,000 a year, that, that, before coming--becoming the chairman of CHA, could not find himself, his directions into a public housing development in this city. And again, you know, it was all based on disrespect because public housing in Chicago is 99% Black--

MADISON DAVIS LACY:

Lets stop.


MADISON DAVIS LACY:

Then tell me about Mooney, then segue as quickly as you can and tell me how it went down that day at that meeting when they tossed you out of there.

MADISON DAVIS LACY:

Is that? Am I on the right track.


MARION STAMPS:

Jane Byrne appointed Andrew Mooney, uh, at $72,000 a year to run CHA. We all knew that Mooney had no idea about running public housing, okay. Aside from that, we were very, very upset in the fact that you have appointed these two women to the board of education, now you're going to appoint this White man to head CHA. CHA is 99% Black and 99% women and children. And we were pushing for a Black person, preferably a female, to head CHA. And for her to, to not to respect our wishes again, clearly showed us that Jane Byrne cared nothing about our concerns and our needs. Because she appointed Andrew Mooney it was like the straw that broke the camel's back. And we just made a decision that we were not going to accept that. At the last board meeting before the election of Mayor Washington really, we went into that board meeting with the full intent of saying to Andrew Mooney, "We do not want you, you cannot stay here, you will not be allowed to function as the chairman of CHA." Along with the fact that again millions of dollars was coming into public housing but we weren't getting any of it. We were not getting the stoves, the refrigerators, the tile, nothing. And when we got to the meeting, uh, it was just this blatant arrogance, blatant arrogance okay. Ah, at that time Renault Robinson, one of the board members and one of the board members who we respected and we knew that was, was protecting our interests began to raise some serious question in terms of some moneys that was being spend in, in CHA as well as some new projects they was getting ready to g--get into. And, uh, Andrew just got totally disrespected--you know, disrespectful in terms of Renault. So, you know, it's like you aren't go--you know, "I'm not going to sit here and allow you to disrespect this brother. Real simple, the meeting is over with." And, you know, and, and that's what it was, you know, "It's over with." And at that point I adjourned the meeting. Of course not being a board member I had to use some unorthodox methods in adjourning the meeting, but the meeting was adjourned. And not too long after that we got a new mayor and we got a new chairman. But again, um, in order to understand the public housing issue in Chicago, you got to understand the politics of the town. And this is one of the most corrupt political system in the country. There is no politics in the world like Chicago politics. And one would have you to believe now that we are fair, we are loving, we are honest, uh, we don't believe in rewarding our friends and punishing our enemies, you know. But we know all of that is a lie, you know. We know that Chicago politics, like nowhere else, determines whether you live or die. It determines whether or not your children will go to a good school or go to a bad school. It will determine whether you live in good housing or bad housing, whether you got good police or bad police. And for us up under all of those administrations we always got the bad, the bad polices, the bad housing, the bad everything. And it was because of and it is because of the Chicago politics in this town. And at, and at, at that time just like it is now, politicians only see poor people, especially poor Black people as a tool to use in order to further their own self interest.

MADISON DAVIS LACY:

Let's stop down.