Interview with Richard Strichartz
QUESTION 1
SHEILA C. BERNARD:

So if you could tell me about Mayor Cavanagh--

RICHARD STRICHARTZ:

Jerry Cavanagh was elected at the age of 33, ah, he was a neighbor of mine, lived right across the street. I worked briefly on his campaign but not all that much, and he came in with the idea that what he wanted to do was to turn the city around. We had had a recession here in Detroit, ah, which had dragged on and on, primarily because of what had happened in the automobile industry, ah, with the increase in production things started to look up, but there was still a need to do a great many things. You didn't have city money to do it, came in, at that point there was, ah, about a 44 million dollar deficit, and you didn't run a deficit, see, we're not like the federal government, so, and so what, what he said was, "OK, let's find ways of, of getting some money." So I set myself to the task of identifying federal programs which were in existence and also working with the National League of Cities and especially the U.S. Conference of Mayors, on trying to create programs which would meet the needs, ah, because the whole infrastructure, you know, sewers and roads, ah, the water program, we had a tremendous expansion in the water program to serve all of southeastern Michigan, uh--

SHEILA C. BERNARD:

OK, can you stop for us?


SHEILA C. BERNARD:

We need a little less detail because we can't, because of the way the program is we need shorter answers so--

SHEILA C. BERNARD:

And if you could also in your answer, let us know how, how successful in terms of, I mean--


RICHARD STRICHARTZ:

When Jerry Cavanagh came in as Mayor, he wanted to--

SHEILA C. BERNARD:

Ready? OK.

RICHARD STRICHARTZ:

When Jerry Cavanagh came in as Mayor he wanted to do something to change the face of the city, he wanted to do in terms of human relations and he wanted to change the physical program. We did a whole series of programs on juvenile delinquency, urban renewal, housing, waters, sewers, curbs, all the sort of things that were important, and then of course, we moved on to the, ah, poverty program, Total Action Against Poverty and then under Johnson there was the culmination in the Model Cities program. All of these things were designed to create the ability to change this city so that people felt that they had an opportunity to make a change and to have something to say about their destiny. Those are important kinds of results to achieve.

SHEILA C. BERNARD:

OK, let's stop. That was, that was great.