Interview with Richard Strichartz
QUESTION 2
SHEILA C. BERNARD:

So it's 1967 and you're watching all these cities go up, how did you see Detroit?

RICHARD STRICHARTZ:

Detroit was a success city, Detroit had involved people in the anti-poverty program, it was not just a City Hall program. We had done things opening up the system, appointing people who represented the total community and this gave you the feeling, ah, if you will, the arrogance, the hubris, that there was no way this was going to happen in Detroit. And it was said after, that some people said they could riot in Detroit because they were sure that Jerry Cavanagh wouldn't let them sh--be shot.

SHEILA C. BERNARD:

Cut. That was a nice answer. I want to ask you to do it again, uh--



SHEILA C. BERNARD:

So watching all the other cities, did you think it would happen in Detroit?

RICHARD STRICHARTZ:

We were sure it wouldn't happen in Detroit. The city had opened up, the programs--

SHEILA C. BERNARD:

Mr. Strichartz, can you start, "We were sure a riot wouldn't happen?"

RICHARD STRICHARTZ:

OK, OK. We were sure a riot would not happen in Detroit. There was an arrogance, a hubris, about the fact that we'd done so much to open up the system, to have people involved in the anti-poverty program from the community, to have appointments from the total community, so there was participation. It was not that there was a, a feeling that a lot of things had been festering and were building up, but that it was happening here in Detroit.