Interview with Calvin Taylor
QUESTION 5
PAUL STECKLER:

Keeping it right in that time period, you get there, you throw that first brick. What did you do then? Just specifically what you did, what you saw.

CALVIN TAYLOR:

I don't really know what I specifically did. I mean, that's a long time ago. That's twenty years ago. Um. You know, I, I do remember tossing a brick or two and I do remember, uh, standing on a car urging people to, you know, to, to maintain their ground. That you know, this is the one time that we must stand up to the people. Um, I remember my high school instructor, Sister--can't even remember her name. What is that lady's name?--Sister Mary Killian came along and I guess she thought I was still in high school, 'cause she told me, "Calvin, you get down off that car." And I looked at her and told her she, you know, something to the effect that she probably was crazy or something like that. But, um, Police put on a pretty good rush. So then everyone decided it's about time to go. So with everyone else I did eventually get off the car, retreat back up Hernando to Clayborne Temple. Um. I'm a little luckier than most people because at the time that I was going back to Clayborne Temple I ran into one of the photographers from the Commercial Appeal and then he asks me about getting some photographs for the paper. So I sort of join hands with him to help him identify you know, certain scenes to shoot, certain people to shoot, and stuff like that. And I guess with his protection and the fact that he had his camera and his press card and that we were together, some of the fear subsided. I mean, I mean I was standing very close to policemen. I mean, I remember distinctly looking at a policeman shouting at a lady who was standing on her porch who was just absolutely mesmerized by the entire scene, trying to figure out what is going on and who's going to do what. And him shouting at her. And I, you know, I was as close to him as I am to you and he didn't do anything to me and I guess it was because I was with the photographer of the Commercial Appeal.