Interview with Dolores Torres
QUESTION 16
BOBBY SHEPARD:

the summer of '68, you knew that there was going to be a strike that following fall in Ocean Hill-Brownsville. What were the plans that were made to keep the schools open? You also knew that 350 teachers had walked out after the firings. What were the plans made that summer?

DOLORES TORRES:

Well, we organized parents and people from the community that we knew to come in and run the schools.

INTERVIEWER:

Could you just begin in the summer of--

DOLORES TORRES:

All right, we still held meetings. We held meetings in different organizations. We had the Brownsville Community Council, down the hill from Brownsville. They had a big hall. We had meetings there. We had meetings in churches. We had meetings in the homes. We had meetings in storefronts--

INTERVIEWER:

Just, just, just give me the time.

DOLORES TORRES:

OK. What we did was organize parents. And ask them would they be willing to come in if it meant stoking the furnace, whatever it meant. Would they be willing to take over class--ah, classes. Men and women. Parents that had kids in the schools. And all of the parents said,"Yes." We had no school, no class that was left unattended. Most of the children came to school. We had children from other communities come into our schools because their schools, ah, were closed. And this is what we did. And it worked quite well.