Interview with Albert Turner
QUESTION 13
INTERVIEWER:

COULD YOU TELL ME UH HOW MANY, TELL ME NOW ABOUT THE SUCCESS, WHAT THE OUTCOME OF ALL THAT VOTER REGISTRATION IS. JUST TELL ME RIGHT NOW IN MARION COUNTY HOW MANY PEOPLE ARE REGISTERED? WHAT PERCENTAGES?

Albert Turner:

Well as a result uh… we haven't stopped here, even in our own home town. And we consider our movement being about fifteen or sixteen years old here now. Uh, at this point we consider ourselves as being somewhat ninety-five percent or better, registered voters here. Uh, we pride ourselves in the fact that almost everybody is a registered voter in Perry County. Uh… in the last election we finally got to what we call "perfection". We turned out thirty-six hundred voters out of forty hundred registered. And uh, this is pretty much all we have that we could register in a sense. We were able to take uh, the total government seat this year. Uh, it didn't all happen this year. Uh, we had two people already elected to the county commissioners' that was elected two years ago. We elected one person to the Board of Education two years ago. And uh, six years ago we made our very first initial election. We elected one person to the Board of Education. All told now we have a total of four black people on the Board of Education out of five and uh, we intend to appoint a black superintendent, uh, come June 30th, when this season ends. Uh, the sheriff of this county is a black man now. The tax collector and tax assessor is black. Uh… we have three of the four uh, people who's on the county commissioners' are black. And of course they still hold the probate judge's office until next election. And uh, they have the circuit clerk until next election. And uh, this is, generally what's happenin' in the black belt. Green County has uh, basically taken the total government, I think they may not even have a white person in it at all…