Interview with Richard Valeriani
QUESTION 7
INTERVIEWER:

I WANT TO KNOW, OR PEOPLE, ANYBODY WOULD BE CURIOUS TO KNOW THAT AFTER WHAT HAD HAPPENED TO YOU, AND YOU'RE BACK OUT ON THE FRONT LINE SO TO SPEAK, COVERING AGAIN THE SAME CAMPAIGN, WHAT DREW YOU BACK, I MEAN WHY DID YOU FEEL YOU HAD TO GET BACK INTO IT?

Richard Valeriani:

It was my job to cover it, I was assigned to that, I had been there in the beginning, and I wanted to be there at the end. It was a very exciting story. I mean I, looking back on it I think it was a great chapter in American history. And I just wanted to be there. As a matter of fact, as I said Chuck Quinn, who was then with NBC was covering with me a lot of those events and he was off the night of the Selma march across the Edmond Pettis bridge thinking that nothing would happen. And I talked to him the next day and when he saw it on television he called me up and he swore that he had missed that. He wanted to be there for those things. I mean it was a very exciting time. And I wanted to be there to cover from the beginning to the end. Um, and as a young reporter, even though something like that has happened, even though you've been injured, uh, covering something. You still approach the story almost with a sense of the village idiot you know, that you can walk in and no harm will befall you, despite the fact, you're there independently, you try to convince yourself and hope that the other will understand that and therefore leave you alone and let you do your job. That was seldom the case covering the civil rights movement.