Interview with Richard Valeriani
QUESTION 8
INTERVIEWER:

WHAT DID YOU FEEL LIKE WHEN YOU SAW THE VIOLENCE VISITED ON THOSE PROTESTERS ON MARCH 7 AFTER WHAT HAD HAPPENED TO YOU?

Richard Valeriani:

I tended to try to keep, and this sounds a little callous, but I tried to stay detached. And I think that I did and that was my job, I, you felt very tense and very excited in a way, with a lot of nervous energy, but my job was there to report what happened and so you try to stay as calm as possible and to look at it as objectively as possible and as detached away as possible so that you could then report it. I raced from there to a telephone. I think I was probably the first person on the air, on, this was on radio. Radio for us was very important in those days, I was the first person on the air with a report of what happened, and you can't go on in some hysterical fashion, you have to make your notes carefully and so I sort of looked at it almost clinically, analytically, feeling all the while very pumped up. I knew that there was that nervous energy, tension and I have to admit, some fear, because you didn't know in that kind of when the passions were aroused, suddenly explodes, whether they're gonna turn on you too. Whether the police and the bystanders are gonna turn on you too because they tended to identify us with the movement.