Interview with David J. Vann
QUESTION 1
INTERVIEWER:

OK DAVID, JUST TO KINDA GET THINGS STARTED HERE, WHAT I'D LIKE TO DO IS GO BACK TO ABOUT PROBABLY ABOUT 1960, JUST BEFORE THE ARTICLES BY HARRISON SALISBURY AND SAY WAS BIRMINGHAM AS BAD AS PEOPLE SAID IT WAS?

David J. Vann:

Well, I don't really think that Birmingham was ever as bad as people said it was. I think in many ways uh, Montgomery was a tougher town, Atlanta in many ways was a tougher town. The main difference between Birmingham and the other Southern cities was we had Bull Connor, who was a very colorful uh, proponent of racia1 segregation. And just the colorful way in which he expressed himself was really the principal difference between Birmingham and other cities. And I don't mean to say that it wasn't a strictly segregated city, 'cuz it was. But he was the main thing that made it so