Interview with Judy Varley
QUESTION 12
DALE ROSEN:

Now, can you tell me what your reactions in Greenwood were to the Black, to Stokely Carmichael's speech about Black Power?

JUDY VARLEY:

That was a very dramatic, ah, evening. He was up on a jury-rigged, ah, dais of sorts, platform with, ah, klieg lights, ah, more light than we had ever seen at night on a march. And, ah--

DALE ROSEN:

I'm sorry. Can you say Stokely Carmichael.

JUDY VARLEY:

I'm sorry. The night of Stokely Carmichael's speech was kind of a dramatic one. He was up on a jury-rigged, ah, platform with a lot of klieg lights, lot of--

DALE ROSEN:

Sorry, a door, we have some extraneous noise, so we get to do it one more time.

JUDY VARLEY:

OK, the night of Stokely Carmichael's speech, it was kind of a dramatic event. It, he was on a jury-rigged platform, ah, and great klieg lights, I've never seen so many lights, ah, on a march. And, ah, we listened and there was a lot of, lot of cheering, lot of yelling, lot of, ah, enthusiasm when he spoke. And he spoke of Black Power. But I came away feeling that the Black Power he was talking about was essentially, ah, the good old American way. The only way you'd get power in the United States is either through the ballot box or the cash register and he was saying that Blacks have got to seize both of those, ah, in, in, ah, their own self interest. And I felt that that was a perfectly acceptable, perfectly fine message. Ah, it did indicate to me that I think our time was past in the South that we needed to go back North and, and make some real, serious changes. Ah, that we needed to clean up our own backyards. And I did not feel badly about that. I felt I had done my bit down here and there were a lot of things to be done back home.

DALE ROSEN:

Let's cut for a second.