Interview with Judy Varley
QUESTION 16
DALE ROSEN:

Tell me about that, other people's reactions and about the New York--

JUDY VARLEY:

Immediately after the speech by Stokely we drifted back to the big tent where we were sleeping and a number of us sat up and talked about it afterward. There seemed to be alarm on the parts of, of some of my colleagues. They read a great deal more into the speech than I did. I felt that the, ah, call for the use of Black Power was legitimate, ah, and, and the way he expressed it was, ah, later when I got back to New York and the march ended, ah, a press conference was held. And, a, a small headline appeared in the New York Post saying, "White Nurse Endorses Black Power." And it was surprising, the amount of flak I had to take. Ah, there, there was a lot of misunderstanding about the term. It was a phrase that was fraught for some people with very, very serious, ah, overtones. And I did not see this.

DALE ROSEN:

What kinds of overtones?

JUDY VARLEY:

Ah, Black violence, ah, violence stemming from, ah, ah, the Black areas, ah, a, ah, thrust to overtake the government as it were, ah, and locally, down, especially down South where they hold the majority or in New York City where Blacks hold the, ah, majority for the ballot box, that's as it should be.