Interview with Ed Vaughn
QUESTION 3
SAM POLLARD:

Here you had this book store, so tell me about this book store, and what it meant?

ED VAUGHN:

Well, Vaughn's book store was certainly something that was new in the community. There had not been a book store here before, and of course I got into the business because I was looking for a book called "A Hundred Years of Lynchings" by Ginsberg, and I was told downtown that they didn't have the book in stock and I decided that I'd see if I could find it and then when I found it and my friends at the post office said that they'd like to read that and other Black books, so I began to order them and sell them out of the trunk of my car. And then I, about 1962 I had opened Vaughn's book store and we were beginning to sell books rather briskly, people were asking questions, and that was pretty much the mood around the book store. We were mainly oriented toward the people who already were Pan-Africanists and Nationalists or people who were on the left in, in the movement, and they, they came to the store, and soon school teachers, children began to come. There was sort of an awakening in the community from New York, we were hearing about things happening there. I sold a, a magazine called "The Liberator", and so the consciousness was being developed and of course "Mohammed Speaks" and those things were happening then, so there was a consciousness that was being raised throughout the community.

SAM POLLARD:

OK, let's cut a second. I just need you to tell me, to introduce the idea part of a whole grown consciousness.



ED VAUGHN:

Well, a great deal of consciousness was taking place in the community. I was selling books, I was selling a magazine called "The Liberator," we had the Afro-American Broadcasting Company which was broadcasting every Saturday on WGPR, broadcasting the speeches of Malcolm X practically every Saturday, we had the "Illustrated News" newspaper which the Cleage brothers put out, Albert and Henry. The Henry brothers were working with a, a group called GOAL, and they also were responsible for the Afro-American Broadcasting System. Central Congregational Church, pastored by Albert Cleage, was beginning to, to make some movement in this particular area. So there was a great deal of consciousness taking place across the community and that consciousness sort of came to bloom when people like Malcolm X would come to town or Elijah Mohammed came. Usually it was Elijah who came, and Malcolm spoke before Elijah, and of course, set the audience on fire. And that was really the, the mood of the, of the, of the times. And there, there was a great deal of change beginning to take place.