Interview with Gov. George C. Wallace
QUESTION 9
INTERVIEWER:

WHEN YOU STOOD IN THE SCHOOL HOUSE DOOR, IT SEEMED LESS AN ACT OF RESISTANCE AND MORE A SYMBOLIC GESTURE.

Gov. George C. Wallace:

It was an act of uh, legal resistance, it was not a physical resistance at all. One reason I had the national guard there is if we did have a, an occasion like Mississippi I was not going to stand for it. What the good people of Mississippi did not anticipate, all these folks from all over the country, all these hate groups the Nazi party, etc. coming to that city and almost destroying that great university, and it was not going to happen at our university. In fact the board of trustees which had one man who belonged to a cabinet of the President of the United States, urged me to come and stand there, because when I went on television, even the Ku Klux Klan leader got up and said the Governor Wallace says stay away, he's gonna raise the constitutional question for all the people of Alabama. So you see, I violated no law, my resistance was legal and not violence, I do not believe in violence, it will not solve any problems.