Interview with Wyatt Tee Walker
QUESTION 12
INTERVIEWER:

BULL—I'M SORRY. WRONG PERSON. LAURIE PRITCHETT.

Wyatt Tee Walker:

Ah, Laurie Pritchett posed as a sophisticated law enforcement official. A better…a more apt description would be slick. And he was not nonviolent as I've seen some people write. He was non-brutal.

INTERVIEWER:

WOULD YOU EXPAND ON THAT A LITTLE BIT FOR ME?

Wyatt Tee Walker:

Well, he developed the reputation that he was using Dr. King's non-violence to blunt Dr. King's campaign, which was not true. The foil for our non-violent campaigns in the South had been the anticipated response of segregationist law enforcement officers such as Jim Clark, in Selma, and Bull Connor in Birmingham, Alabama. Laurie Pritchett was of a different stripe. He probably had finished high school, and, as I say, I…I think the apt description was slick. He did have enough intelligence, to read Dr. King's book, and he culled from that a way to avoid confrontation, and inducing the great ferment in the national community by being non-brutal rather than being non-violent. It's…it's…it's almost—it's bizarre to say that a segregationist system or a law enforcement official of a segregationist system could be non-violent. Because first of all, you…non-violence works in a moral climate, and segregation is not a moral climate.**