Interview with Wyatt Tee Walker
QUESTION 22
INTERVIEWER:

CAN I HAVE ANOTHER LITTLE SHORT HIT LIST? WHAT WAS…START WITH JAMES BEVEL.

Wyatt Tee Walker:

James Bevel had…had one of the best…

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

[unintelligible] start that again, I was…

Wyatt Tee Walker:

Alright. James Bevel had one of the best tact—tactical minds in our movement. And one of the best facilities for analyzing segregation as a system and what it does to black people. As you know, he was a native of Ittabena, Mississippi, and anybody who grew up in Mississippi in his generation certainly had all of the emotional and psychological scars of what segregation does to them. So he was, hyper-sensitive to it, and he drew very strong analogies as to how you had to fight the enemy. There was no one—[unintelligible background conversation].

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

Moving on to take twenty-one. Continuation of Wyatt Tee Walker interview. [unintelligible background conversation].

Wyatt Tee Walker:

…any better at mobilizing young people. Well, I was about to finish a sentence, I don't know whether you want me to finish. There was no one any better at mobilizing young people than James Bevel. And, had it not been for him and probably…the support of help of Dr. Cotton with her song leading skills and Andrew Young, Andrew Young to some extent, the influx of the school children into the Birmingham equation might not have taken place. I think he was a skillful tactician and without being immodest, I think the combination of James Bevel and Wyatt Walker was unbeatable.