Interview with Thomas R. Waring
QUESTION 8
INTERVIEWER:

EXCUSE ME, I'M SORRY. JUST A MINUTE WHILE HE SETTLES HIMSELF IN, AND THEN WE'LL ASK YOU ABOUT THIS KIND OF DETAIL ON THE DIFFERENCES THAT YOU WERE… OK.

Thomas R. Waring:

In discussing the differences of uh, cultural aspects of the racial situation, of course, it's again a very broad subject, and difficult to generalize on, because it involves so many different individuals. But it's only, uh, just in general, speaking generally, at the time, some of the colored people's customs were not, uh, not totally acceptable to the white people. In that they were careless about their marital relations, and health situations, they were quite often, again, careless, and uh, the – the backgrounds in which their children were raised were not – they didn't have many books or reading matter, and uh, the children just simply weren't on the same level as the white children. If they were put into the grades by ages, it would disrupt the educational quality of the, of the white people. And for that reason, the white people were not ready yet to merge the schools. They thought that a time should be allowed for the colored people to raise their own cultural levels before they would fit into the mixed, uh, mixed lifestyle.