Interview with Thomas R. Waring
QUESTION 10
INTERVIEWER:

THAT'S VERY, VERY NICE. UM, YEAH, STOP FOR A MOMENT. AND I'LL ASK YOU THE QUESTION AGAIN SO THAT YOU CAN START YOUR ANSWER, WHICH IS, COULD YOU TELL ME ABOUT – A LITTLE BIT ABOUT MASSIVE RESISTANCE, AND HOW SURPRISED YOU WERE THAT IT WAS THIS PEACEFUL?

Thomas R. Waring:

Well, the "Massive Resistance" was just one of the phrases [cough] used in an effort to coalesce public opinion among white people in the South, and to let [cough] the rest of the country know about it and uh, it, it had some overtones which would perhaps be a little on the dangerous side, meaning an invitation to white people to demonstrate and be disorderly in the streets as, as some of the black people were doing in their demands for quote, "equal rights" unquote. Uh, and I was agreeably surprised that such violence did not develop, and I think it is a tribute to the people of both races that those things did not develop. I think there was an underlying feeling of good will of both races, so that they did not carry out the burn, baby burn policy of making life too tough for white people to resist, and the "Massive Resistance" was just one of the catch words – terms that was used to uh, try to encourage white people to express themselves. I think it had some limited success, but in the, in the long run, of course, it didn't work, because the South was outnumbered and outgunned, again, lost a, a cause. But the cause is not really gone yet, we haven't got the end of the story.