Interview with Thomas R. Waring
QUESTION 17
INTERVIEWER:

THE ONLY REAL CASE OF INTERPOSITION THAT GOT VERY DANGEROUS, OF COURSE, WAS JAMES MEREDITH AT OLE MISS AND I WONDERED, UM, AS A REPORTER, ABOUT THE COVERAGE, ABOUT THE SYMPATHY TO – TO THE MISSISSIPPI POSITION. DO YOU REMEMBER THAT?

Thomas R. Waring:

Yes. We sent a reporter to Mississippi to uh, look into the – from, from our point of view. Uh, I don't remember the details of it. I remember, of course, the James Meredith case, and, and uh, it was a very sorrowful event. And it was the kind of thing that did, did give responsible people a pause as to how far shall we go in – in making the resistance. George Wallace standing at the schoolhouse door, and things of that sort happening, and the, when the troops being called into Arkansas, it got very, very touchy, rugged and dangerous. And it was a perilous situation, and again, I must repeat, that I think it is a great tribute to the underlying good will between the races and the common sense of the majority of – in both white and black, that uh, fighting did not erupt, and there was not a breakdown in, in uh, civil government.