Interview with Thomas R. Waring
QUESTION 19
INTERVIEWER:

MMMM. I THINK THAT'S VERY IMPORTANT. COULD YOU STOP FOR A MOMENT?

Thomas R. Waring:

On the separate but equal subject that we have discussed, of course, there was valid complaints, that in many areas of the South, the, the schools for colored people were inferior, both insofar as the buildings were concerned, and also the money expended. But you must remember that the South was in a – not a rich part of the country, and uh, many of the country schools for white people were also inadequate I think that the white people felt an obligation to provide better schooling for the white—for the blacks, and would get around to doing something it, but perhaps they were slow. And, they were slow for one reason, because as I said that, um… they were poor. Poor people and these are poor neighborhoods. The black people themselves, because they were in a lower economic bracket, did not contribute much in the way of tax money.