Interview with Thomas R. Waring
QUESTION 26
INTERVIEWER:

OH NO, I MEANT IN TERMS OF – FOR EXAMPLE, WE TALKED ABOUT THE PAPER CURTAIN, THE KINDS OF THINGS THAT WERE NOT IN THE NORTHERN PRESS AT THAT TIME.

Thomas R. Waring:

Well, I'm – if there was a paper curtain at the time, and I was one who used that term, whether I invented it or just borrowed it from somebody, I'm not sure, but I used it frequently. I think the paper curtain is still there. I don't, I don't think that the uh, that the sympath–the sympathetic view of the white southerner's case has yet become generally available. Uh, I think that uh, more sympathy and understanding should be given to what in some cases now is a minority. In the city of Charleston, for instance, the white people are a minority. I don—I'm—don't think that we should be crying for sympathy and help. I think we ought to just all try to understand one another's problems, and then we've got them.