Interview with Thomas R. Waring
QUESTION 2
INTERVIEWER:

THAT'S, THAT'S A WONDERFUL ANSWER. THAT'S TERRIFIC. UM, MAYBE YOU COULD ELABORATE A LITTLE BIT ABOUT SEGREGATION, PARTICULARLY ABOUT WHAT THE, WHAT IT MEANT, SEPARATE BUT EQUAL, THAT CONCEPT THAT, THAT THE SOUTH WORKED ON.

Thomas R. Waring:

Well, the way I was brought up to look at it is a mutual respect for the uh, qualities and limitations of both races. It is true that uh, economically, and socially, for the most part, the colored people were on a different level from the white people, uh, not that poverty is a racial characteristic, but uh, there just was not a very large black mu—iddle class in the South at that time. And a great deal of the segregation was just uh, the way people happened to be born, where they lived, and how they grew up. And the schools were separate. And uh, there was uh, certainly a cultural difference, some of which is racial, and some of which is economic, and some of which is social. And when the – when the uh, school desegregation movement began to get into a, even a broader field, and threatening violence, and, as it, as did break out in demonstrations in some parts of the country, why it – it changed the whole aspect of race relations. I think on the whole, the southern people of both races have responded reasonably well to the changes. We've avoided some of the horrors that racial conflict would bring on our country, and uh, looking back over the thirty years, I think we've been rather lucky in how we have weathered the changes that have come about.