Interview with Thomas R. Waring
QUESTION 6
INTERVIEWER:

COULD YOU STOP FOR A MOMENT, PLEASE? UM, ARE YOU SEEING A LITTLE PEEP OF WHITE IF THAT FAN IS IF YOU'LL HOLD FOR A MOMENT WHILE THEY SET THE CAMERA.

Thomas R. Waring:

I was speaking of the back of the bus, which was a particularly irritating aspect for the, for the colored people of the south. Many southerners were quite ready, and uh – to make a change in transitory contacts with, with the other race, with no segregation standing in line at the post office or in the banks and people uh, passed each other in the streets without any problem. In fact, uh, many, many white people had house servants who were on close, intimate terms with the family and with close, friendly uh, relations over periods of years. Families knowing each other well. Uh, white southerners were completely at home in—in associating with colored people and for those reasons, there were many uh, aspects of segregation that could easily be remedied, and were, as uh, as the – as the colored individuals grew into the middle class way of uh, way of living. But that did not extend, in the, in the opinion of white southerners as I understood it, and as a newspaperman, I had – had made it my business to try to get a feeling for how the public felt, uh, that they were not ready to, to open the schools to the two races together.