Interview with Hollis Watkins
QUESTION 19
INTERVIEWER:

UM, I WANT YOU—YOU TO POSSIBLY TALK TO ME SOMETHING ABOUT UM, STOKLEY AND WHAT ROLE HE MIGHT HAVE PLAYED IN HELPING TO FOCUS THE IDEAS OF FOR THE STRUGGLE FOR POWER IN MISSISSIPPI AND THE IDEA, AND THE MOVE AWAY FROM SAY, NONVIOLENCE AS A UM, TACTIC HERE IN THE STATE.

Hollis Watkins:

Yeah, I worked in the same district that Stokley was in, uh, and that was basically because I was in, had already worked in the Greenwood area with Willy and Sam and had also gone down into Macomb area, and Stokely was in charge of the second congressional district. Uh, as far as the nonviolent question, uh, most of the people from Mississippi never really accepted nonviolence. You know, we went along with that being a proper tactic at different times here and there but as far as really accepting it then, none of us really accepted that. That was a position that Stokely had began to push and and talk about moreso and I think in terms of Stokely's position in pushing moving away from, from nonviolence, and uh, acquiring power just kind of helped uh, enhance the feeling and attitude that uh, people in Mississippi had. People in Mississippi basically was of the same kind of opinion that people in Lounds County Alabama that originally started the black party believe that in order to be successful completely we have to be a political and economic system simultaneously and be prepared to defend and protect that even with our lives and that doesn't imply nonviolence, but uh, neither does it apply, I mean imply aggressive violence, but neither does it apply, I mean imply aggressive violence, but it does, you know, mean that you're prepared to defend. And I think that's the way people looked at it rather than an aggressive thing, but a thing that really consolidated around the idea of defending that which is meaningful and productive.

FILM PRODUCTION TEAM:

[ Camera Roll 341 at this point has rolled out. We're going to 342.]