Interview with Hollis Watkins
QUESTION 25
INTERVIEWER:

OK, UM, nineteen, WHAT DID YOU RISK, BECOMING A PART IN… WHAT KIND OF THINGS WERE YOU RISKING AS A NATIVE MISSISSIPPIAN?

Hollis Watkins:

As a native Mississippian, there were many things I was risking. One of the things I was risking and did face was being ostrasized by my family. After I uh, participated in the first sit-in demonstration in Woolworth's lunch counters my relatives would see me walking down the street and then they would pass over on to the other side rather than meet me on the street. Because they was afraid of what white people might do to them because they were my relatives. Uh, this is aunts, uncles, first cousins, and, you know, close relatives. In addition to that I, I put on the line the whole thing of being able to ever get a job in Mississippi. Put on the line the whole thing of whether I would ever be able to get a education, you know, in the Mississ—in Mississippi. Or whether that mark would go through on my children and their children. So these are just a few of the things that, you know, I was putting on the line when I did what I did, as well as what kind of reprisals that might come to my mother and father, you know, who was living, who had to support me at that time.