Interview with Sheyann Webb
QUESTION 10
INTERVIEWER:

WHEN THE MARCH TO MONTGOMERY FINALLY GOT STARTED, THE FINAL MARCH AFTER ALL THAT STUFF THAT HAPPENED IN THE MIDDLE, YOU ONLY GOT SO FAR, YOU TOLD ME, CAN YOU TELL ME A LITTLE BIT OF WHY THAT HAPPENED?

Sheyann Webb:

Well, first of all, I had gotten a little older for this final uh, march to Montgomery. I was uh, at a predominant white school, and at the time, I was, I was still involved in the movement, but I was getting threats from my teachers about that, uh, prior to this march. And even with my parents and at this point it was a burden on my grades. And my parents had indicated to me over and over again, please don't march. And I had written them a note, prior to the morning of this march and left it on the washer saying that, I'm sorry Mom and Dad, but I'm going to march. And I did, and on the way to Montgomery, there was a rest stop, and there was sandwiches and soup and all those good things, and I went to the front where Dr. King was, and I told him, I said, I don't have permission to march, and he said, You don't? But I'm going to march anyway. And he said, OK now, who are you with? I said, I'm with Margaret Moore and I went back to where she was and I went on. But, they put me in a van, I didn't march all the way, I was transported onto Montgomery in a van. And I remember going to the uh, Hotel, uh, where some of the secretaries and assistants for you know, Dr. King, were there and they were very concerned with me at the time, uh, continuing to march without, you know, my parents knowing. And we went on to St. Jude that night for the mass rally and I recall uh, an announcement over the intercom, Sheyann Webb, your parents are behind the stage waiting for you. And I went back there, and I was, I was real nervous because, I had gotten a little older, I knew a little better and uh, I had already been warned also, and my mother and father, they weren't as mad as I thought they were. But the first thing that they told was that I was suspended from school because I marched. And that wasn't too bad at the time, I was more afraid of the whipping than anything else, and as we traveled back to Selma that night, they indicated to me that uh, the principal of my school had called and said that I would be suspended for three days. And uh, they would have to bring me back and when I had gotten home, my father sat down and talked to me. He said, Now, you know, that you will fail school now to continue being involved and I didn't say anything. And when I did go back to school it was, it was a little different, a different feeling simply because I didn't know that it had gotten to that point with me being suspended. But uh, I still passed.

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